Transgender Issues in Pakistan and How They are Treated as Sons of a Lesser God - Lunar Gaze Lunar Gaze: Transgender Issues in Pakistan and How They are Treated as Sons of a Lesser God
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Transgender Issues in Pakistan and How They are Treated as Sons of a Lesser God

Transgender people are officially known as "third gender" citizens in Pakistan. A group that includes cross-dressers, transsexuals, eunuchs, hermaphrodites and transitive - face widespread violence, intimidation and abuse.

May 10, 2020

/ by APP
Khawaja Sara Society Rejects Transgender Community Statistics ...
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Transgender people are officially known as "third gender" citizens in Pakistan. A group that includes cross-dressers, transsexuals, eunuchs, hermaphrodites, and transitive - face widespread violence, intimidation, and abuse. 

In recent years, the minority group has made significant strides in a profoundly conservative country in Pakistan, where ethnic, religious, and sexual minorities are often the victims of violence and persecution. Yet these benefits have done little to cover up the problematic lives of third-generation citizens.

Many describe themselves as "professional wedding dancers", but supporters say they are often forced to earn a living by begging and prostitution. Often dressed in brightly colored saris and wearing heavy makeup, some people ask for money from people walking the streets, committing extortion, sexual violence, and other crimes.
They often show up uninvited to essential family gatherings, such as weddings and birthdays, until they are paid or given gifts, after which they leave. At such events, transgender people are often seen as a sign of good luck, while the curse of an unwanted transgender person creates fear.

The roots of the mob in the subcontinent go back centuries to the time of the Mughal emperors, who kept transgender people as gatekeepers and guardians of their greed. Some transgender people played essential roles in the courts, wielded influence over state affairs, and acted as trustees for their masters.

But after the collapse of the Mughal Empire in the 19th century and the end of British colonial rule, their status diminished, and their carelessness pushed many to the margins of society.

Pakistan first documented its transgender population in the 2017 census. It estimates that the number is closer to 10,000. According to these counts, transgender people make up 0.005% of the total population. Even so, owning one is still beyond the reach of the average person.

The status of this third gender in Pakistan is deficient. They are deprived of their protected rights. People use hesitant language and refer to it as Hijra. Why do we deny the fact that transgender people were mostly personal protectors of the Mughal emperors? 
In Pakistan, the rights of transgender people are severely violated because they are not given due respect in society. Many transgender people become victims of sexual harassment. Neither do the higher authorities take action against them nor can they disclose their own affairs. Recently, a school was opened by an NGO to give Trans children their educational rights, but they are working on a tiny scale.

Transgender people are often discriminated against in their job search and are forced to beg, dance, or act as prostitutes to earn money. Variables are also deprived of the right to health care. In June 2016, Ali Shah, a 23-year-old transgender worker, died as a result of not receiving timely medical treatment. The hospital staff was unable to decide whether to admit him to the male or female ward and let him die in the hospital.

Author: Ayyan Ahmed




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